British Open 2019 Live

British Open 2019 : Thanks to the PGA Tour’s new schedule, British Open 2019 is now the fourth and final men’s major championship of the season Here’s our ever-changing weekly ranking of the best bets (with odds from Westgate Las Vegas Superbook) to win the British Open 2019 Reason to pick: Another golfer SportsLine simulated the 2019 British Open 10000 times and came up with a surprising leaderboard

Rory McIlroy was just 16 years old when he broke the course record at Royal Portrush Golf Club in Northern Ireland, home to the British Open this year.

He shot a 61. It was that round at the 2005 North of Ireland Championship — highlighted by nine birdies and one eagle — that ignited his career. It was the announcement to the golf world that he had arrived.

“It was unbelievable and surreal how someone managed to shoot such a low score — he was only 16,” Gary McNeill, the Royal Portrush club pro who was there that day, said in an interview.

“Everyone was shocked,” he said. “It was a special day, and a signal that this kid was something. Lots of kids have something, but rarely amount to much. He was impressive in the way he was able to maintain that concentration and focus. He was fearless. That’s one of the things that all the great players have.”

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Stephen Crowe was McIlroy’s partner that day.

“It started off steady enough,” he said. “I was thinking it was going to be a solid round, but nothing special. Then from nowhere he went from 2 under to 6 under.

“At that stage, word was getting out. He always had a crowd around him, but that day the crowd got bigger as he got more birdies.”

McIlroy also knew he had done something special.

“I was still lying in my bed last night thinking about it,” he told reporters the next day. “To shoot 61 anywhere is unbelievable, but to shoot it round Royal Portrush is even better.”

Fourteen years later, McIlroy still remembers that day. “There are not many golf runs that I remember every shot, but that day I do,” he said in a recent interview released by the tournament.

He remembers missing a putt at the first hole for a birdie. Driving a 6-iron onto the green at the second, where he two-putted for a birdie; and the birdie he made on the par-3 sixth hole. He remembers his wedge shot on the par-5 ninth and the eagle on 10. With a birdie on the 11th, he was 6 under. “At that point I realized I was doing something special,” he said. Five birdies followed.

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At the 17th hole, there was a wait as players gathered at the tee. McIlroy stepped away to take some practice swings.

“I think I had probably caught myself thinking about it a little too much,” he said. “I wanted to go clear my head a bit and start afresh with a new golf shot.”

McIlroy returned to the tee and hit a perfect drive, followed by a long iron to the front right side of the green and a two-putt for birdie. He closed out the round with a final birdie and carded a 61, breaking the previous course record of 64 set by Randal Evans in 2002.

“That confidence I had and the cockiness at 16,” he said. “Sometimes, I need to rediscover that.”

Royal Portrush has two links courses: the Dunluce Links and Valley Links. The Open, which starts on Thursday, will be played on Dunluce, on a par-72, 7,317-yard track designed by Harry Colt.

[Read more on how the British Open finally returned to Royal Portrush after almost 70 years.]

Royal Portrush previously hosted the British Open in 1951. The club also held the Irish Open in 2012, where McIlroy tied at 10 with 11 under. It has changed slightly since his course record, with the golf architect Martin Ebert updating it to meet championship standards.

McIlroy played the front nine last Saturday, including the new seventh and eighth holes.

“He just played them all alone,” said McNeill, the club pro. “He was really excited. He was buzzing.”

McIlroy called the new eighth hole, a par 4 at 430 yards, “a huge improvement.”

There are two bunkers to contend with. “You have two options,” he said. “You can take the bunkers out of play short or you can take the bunkers out of play long. Most guys lay back.” McIlroy played long.

He recognized the pressure to perform for hometown crowds.

“In my lifetime, I never thought I’d get to play an Open championship at home in Northern Ireland,” he said recently. “It’s going to be massive. That week has been earmarked for a long time. It’s going to be one of those weeks where I have to enjoy the opportunity of getting to play in front of my hometown, not trying too hard, not putting myself under a lot of pressure. Just to go out and enjoy it, because it might be the only time I get to do it.”

As the 148th Open Championship starts to come into focus, it’s time to talk about the golfers best suited to win this event. Even though there are 156 players in the field, not all of them have an equivalent chance of taking home the Claret Jug. There is a clear top tier, but there is also a lurking second tier beyond that ready to clean things up at Royal Portrush if the mega-favorites falter.

Here are the top 25 golfers going into this tournament, ranked from the top by how likely they are to win the final major championship of 2019.

1. Brooks Koepka (Best finish — T6 in 2017): If the best major championship golfer in the world has a weakness, I suppose it’s The Open. Although I feel a bit silly saying that a pair of top-10 finishes in his last three starts is a weakness. Regardless, he’s proven that of all the top dogs, his stuff is the most suited to these types of events. I could not possibly care less about the finishes in non-majors. In fact, I wish he would just stop playing non-majors altogether. Can you imagine? The best golfer in the world shows up four times a year and spends the other 48 weeks making sure the filters on his Instagram feed are properly adjusted.

2. Rory McIlroy (Won in 2014): The storyline honestly might be a little too good. McIlroy has been the most consistently great major championship golfer over the last decade and arguably the best player on the planet in 2019. And he’s going back to a course in Royal Portrush where he holds the course record. If he wins this Open with this field then the last five years of futility suddenly vanishes like it never happened. Poof, Rory got to five, and only nine post-World War II golfers would have more major titles, and all of them are legends.

3. Matt Kuchar (2nd in 2017): Good afternoon, I’m here to break some news to you. The information is three-pronged. All I’m doing is prepping you for what could possibly go down at Portrush this week.

Matt Kuchar is having the best season of his career.
Matt Kuchar is in a group of eight who have multiple top 10s in the last five Opens.
Matt Kuchar crushed early at the Scottish Open last weekend.
4. Adam Scott (2nd in 2012): The Australian finished in the top eight at both Bethpage Black and Pebble Beach, and he’s having the best season of anyone yet to win. Also, he has a history here. Some might say it is a dark and sordid history — and some of it is! — but the man hasn’t missed an Open cut since Tom Watson nearly won in 2009 and only has one finish north of the top 25 in his last eight tries.

5. Justin Rose (T2 in 2018): His best finish at this tournament until last year when he barely made the cut and went on to take T2 was in 1998 when he went T4 as an amateur. A Rose win wouldn’t do much broadly, but Portrush would fit nicely into his preposterous collection of conquered courses.

6. Xander Schauffele (T2 in 2018): The chasm between T2 and solo 1 is wider than it may appear. We know Schauffele has the talent — that’s fairly obvious at this point — but does he have the thing it takes to close a three-stroke lead with 13 holes left and a bunch of multiple-time major winners huffing at his neck? It’s one of a handful of scenarios we haven’t yet seen that would pique my curiosity.

7. Patrick Cantlay (T12 in 2018): Strangely, last season was his first appearance at The Open. He took advantage with a T12 finish, and now he’s having one of the great strokes gained seasons of the last 20 years. It will be tough to watch him in Europe for the first time since the last time we could have seen him in Europe at the 2018 Ryder Cup.

8. Tiger Woods (Won in 2000, 2005, 2006): I could justify anywhere between about 3-20 on this list. The reality here is that we don’t know if the big break between events is great or horrible for him. It would be easy to take the PGA Championship and U.S. Open data and extrapolate it to say that he should be playing more, but Bethpage Black is such a different track than Portrush. Tiger contending at Carnoustie last season opened my eyes to the reality that as long as the spine is vertical, Tiger is going to be a thorn at Opens for many, many more years.

9. Henrik Stenson (Won in 2016): After a sluggish start to 2019, he’s had three straight top 10s and is cresting at the right time. No word yet on the effects of Brexit on getting his 3-wood through security in Belfast.

10. Dustin Johnson (T2 in 2011): I’ll do it because I respect the game, but he only has one top-10 finish in his last six after nearly swiping the 2011 rendition.

11. Jon Rahm (T44 in 2017): It’s not that hard to envision because Rahm wins everywhere in the world — if you’re bagging Lahinch and Torrey Pines, you’re a dude — but his Open record concerns me a bit. Shouldn’t he have at least a top-30 finish at this point?

12. Francesco Molinari (Won in 2018): I’m worried that the Big Cat may have broken him at Augusta National. He doesn’t have a top 10 since then.

13. Tommy Fleetwood (T12 in 2018): It feels like I say to myself, “Man it’s easy to see Fleetwood winning here” at least three times every major season.

14. Justin Thomas (T53 in 2016): Might be the forgotten man. Also might be like the third-best player in the world. We live in a world that doesn’t think beyond the last week, much less the last three months, but Thomas was awesome to start 2019 and played quite well in Scotland last weekend. I confess the T53-MC-MC start to his Open career does not engender a load of confidence.

15. Hideki Matsuyama (T6 in 2013): Has not thrived at this tournament recently, but he’s having an unbelievable ball-striking season and should be helped by this little fact as noted by Golfweek.

The Forecaddie counted an almost perfect blend of shot shapes required off the tees and greens, setting up ideally for stout ball strikers who may just be so-so on the putting surfaces.

16. Louis Oosthuizen (Won in 2010): T7 at the U.S. Open was just his second top-10 at a major since nearly winning St. Andrews in 2015. I loved this recent tidbit about why Oosthuizen once played the John Deere Classic the week before the Open (although he didn’t this year) before taking the chartered flight from Illinois to Europe.

The jet has also drawn elite players with a curiosity for the tournament. “Louis Oosthuizen is a huge John Deere guy,” Peterson said. “He bought a 6000 series tractor with his Open winnings and came here the year after he won to go on a factory tour. The jet allowed him to still get on and go and defend.”

17. Webb Simpson (T12 in 2018): Since missing the cut at Liverpool in 2014, Simpson has steadily improved every year at this event. That culminated in a T12 last year at Carnoustie. Last time we saw him in Europe, he was downing Justin Rose in a Ryder Cup singles match.

18. Rickie Fowler (T2 in 2014): Interestingly, since he lost to McIlroy in 2014, Fowler hasn’t finished in the top 10 at a tournament where he should thrive. No top 10s anywhere this year since the Wells Fargo Championship in May.

19. Jason Day (T4 in 2015): Doesn’t top 10 at Opens but doesn’t really miss cuts either. I’m unsure of the antihistamine situation in Northern Ireland.

20. Jordan Spieth (Won in 2017): I realize this sounds ludicrous given how poor he’s been in 2019, but I can’t ignore the three top 10s here in the last five years, nor the whole “playing in the final pairing” thing last year at Carnoustie. These places have a way of unearthing whatever magic you have buried.

21. Marc Leishman (T2 in 2015): He’s one of just four golfers with three or more top 10s at the last five of these. The faster and firmer the track, the better off Leishman should be. He should thrive at a classic like Portrush

Northern Ireland Open Championship 2019

Northern Ireland Open Championship 2019: The Northern Ireland Open Championship 2019 will be the 148th Open Championship, scheduled for 18–21 July at Royal Portrush Golf Club in County Antrim, Northern Ireland The 148th Open will be played at Royal Portrush from 14-21 July 2019, marking a historic return to Northern Ireland Open Championship 2019 original and most international golf

Rory McIlroy was just 16 years old when he broke the course record at Royal Portrush Golf Club in Northern Ireland, home to the British Open this year.

He shot a 61. It was that round at the 2005 North of Ireland Championship — highlighted by nine birdies and one eagle — that ignited his career. It was the announcement to the golf world that he had arrived.

“It was unbelievable and surreal how someone managed to shoot such a low score — he was only 16,” Gary McNeill, the Royal Portrush club pro who was there that day, said in an interview.

“Everyone was shocked,” he said. “It was a special day, and a signal that this kid was something. Lots of kids have something, but rarely amount to much. He was impressive in the way he was able to maintain that concentration and focus. He was fearless. That’s one of the things that all the great players have.”

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Stephen Crowe was McIlroy’s partner that day.

“It started off steady enough,” he said. “I was thinking it was going to be a solid round, but nothing special. Then from nowhere he went from 2 under to 6 under.

“At that stage, word was getting out. He always had a crowd around him, but that day the crowd got bigger as he got more birdies.”

McIlroy also knew he had done something special.

“I was still lying in my bed last night thinking about it,” he told reporters the next day. “To shoot 61 anywhere is unbelievable, but to shoot it round Royal Portrush is even better.”

Fourteen years later, McIlroy still remembers that day. “There are not many golf runs that I remember every shot, but that day I do,” he said in a recent interview released by the tournament.

He remembers missing a putt at the first hole for a birdie. Driving a 6-iron onto the green at the second, where he two-putted for a birdie; and the birdie he made on the par-3 sixth hole. He remembers his wedge shot on the par-5 ninth and the eagle on 10. With a birdie on the 11th, he was 6 under. “At that point I realized I was doing something special,” he said. Five birdies followed.

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At the 17th hole, there was a wait as players gathered at the tee. McIlroy stepped away to take some practice swings.

“I think I had probably caught myself thinking about it a little too much,” he said. “I wanted to go clear my head a bit and start afresh with a new golf shot.”

McIlroy returned to the tee and hit a perfect drive, followed by a long iron to the front right side of the green and a two-putt for birdie. He closed out the round with a final birdie and carded a 61, breaking the previous course record of 64 set by Randal Evans in 2002.

“That confidence I had and the cockiness at 16,” he said. “Sometimes, I need to rediscover that.”

Royal Portrush has two links courses: the Dunluce Links and Valley Links. The Open, which starts on Thursday, will be played on Dunluce, on a par-72, 7,317-yard track designed by Harry Colt.

[Read more on how the British Open finally returned to Royal Portrush after almost 70 years.]

Royal Portrush previously hosted the British Open in 1951. The club also held the Irish Open in 2012, where McIlroy tied at 10 with 11 under. It has changed slightly since his course record, with the golf architect Martin Ebert updating it to meet championship standards.

McIlroy played the front nine last Saturday, including the new seventh and eighth holes.

“He just played them all alone,” said McNeill, the club pro. “He was really excited. He was buzzing.”

McIlroy called the new eighth hole, a par 4 at 430 yards, “a huge improvement.”

There are two bunkers to contend with. “You have two options,” he said. “You can take the bunkers out of play short or you can take the bunkers out of play long. Most guys lay back.” McIlroy played long.

He recognized the pressure to perform for hometown crowds.

“In my lifetime, I never thought I’d get to play an Open championship at home in Northern Ireland,” he said recently. “It’s going to be massive. That week has been earmarked for a long time. It’s going to be one of those weeks where I have to enjoy the opportunity of getting to play in front of my hometown, not trying too hard, not putting myself under a lot of pressure. Just to go out and enjoy it, because it might be the only time I get to do it.”

As the 148th Open Championship starts to come into focus, it’s time to talk about the golfers best suited to win this event. Even though there are 156 players in the field, not all of them have an equivalent chance of taking home the Claret Jug. There is a clear top tier, but there is also a lurking second tier beyond that ready to clean things up at Royal Portrush if the mega-favorites falter.

Here are the top 25 golfers going into this tournament, ranked from the top by how likely they are to win the final major championship of 2019.

1. Brooks Koepka (Best finish — T6 in 2017): If the best major championship golfer in the world has a weakness, I suppose it’s The Open. Although I feel a bit silly saying that a pair of top-10 finishes in his last three starts is a weakness. Regardless, he’s proven that of all the top dogs, his stuff is the most suited to these types of events. I could not possibly care less about the finishes in non-majors. In fact, I wish he would just stop playing non-majors altogether. Can you imagine? The best golfer in the world shows up four times a year and spends the other 48 weeks making sure the filters on his Instagram feed are properly adjusted.

2. Rory McIlroy (Won in 2014): The storyline honestly might be a little too good. McIlroy has been the most consistently great major championship golfer over the last decade and arguably the best player on the planet in 2019. And he’s going back to a course in Royal Portrush where he holds the course record. If he wins this Open with this field then the last five years of futility suddenly vanishes like it never happened. Poof, Rory got to five, and only nine post-World War II golfers would have more major titles, and all of them are legends.

3. Matt Kuchar (2nd in 2017): Good afternoon, I’m here to break some news to you. The information is three-pronged. All I’m doing is prepping you for what could possibly go down at Portrush this week.

Matt Kuchar is having the best season of his career.
Matt Kuchar is in a group of eight who have multiple top 10s in the last five Opens.
Matt Kuchar crushed early at the Scottish Open last weekend.
4. Adam Scott (2nd in 2012): The Australian finished in the top eight at both Bethpage Black and Pebble Beach, and he’s having the best season of anyone yet to win. Also, he has a history here. Some might say it is a dark and sordid history — and some of it is! — but the man hasn’t missed an Open cut since Tom Watson nearly won in 2009 and only has one finish north of the top 25 in his last eight tries.

5. Justin Rose (T2 in 2018): His best finish at this tournament until last year when he barely made the cut and went on to take T2 was in 1998 when he went T4 as an amateur. A Rose win wouldn’t do much broadly, but Portrush would fit nicely into his preposterous collection of conquered courses.

6. Xander Schauffele (T2 in 2018): The chasm between T2 and solo 1 is wider than it may appear. We know Schauffele has the talent — that’s fairly obvious at this point — but does he have the thing it takes to close a three-stroke lead with 13 holes left and a bunch of multiple-time major winners huffing at his neck? It’s one of a handful of scenarios we haven’t yet seen that would pique my curiosity.

7. Patrick Cantlay (T12 in 2018): Strangely, last season was his first appearance at The Open. He took advantage with a T12 finish, and now he’s having one of the great strokes gained seasons of the last 20 years. It will be tough to watch him in Europe for the first time since the last time we could have seen him in Europe at the 2018 Ryder Cup.

8. Tiger Woods (Won in 2000, 2005, 2006): I could justify anywhere between about 3-20 on this list. The reality here is that we don’t know if the big break between events is great or horrible for him. It would be easy to take the PGA Championship and U.S. Open data and extrapolate it to say that he should be playing more, but Bethpage Black is such a different track than Portrush. Tiger contending at Carnoustie last season opened my eyes to the reality that as long as the spine is vertical, Tiger is going to be a thorn at Opens for many, many more years.

9. Henrik Stenson (Won in 2016): After a sluggish start to 2019, he’s had three straight top 10s and is cresting at the right time. No word yet on the effects of Brexit on getting his 3-wood through security in Belfast.

10. Dustin Johnson (T2 in 2011): I’ll do it because I respect the game, but he only has one top-10 finish in his last six after nearly swiping the 2011 rendition.

11. Jon Rahm (T44 in 2017): It’s not that hard to envision because Rahm wins everywhere in the world — if you’re bagging Lahinch and Torrey Pines, you’re a dude — but his Open record concerns me a bit. Shouldn’t he have at least a top-30 finish at this point?

12. Francesco Molinari (Won in 2018): I’m worried that the Big Cat may have broken him at Augusta National. He doesn’t have a top 10 since then.

13. Tommy Fleetwood (T12 in 2018): It feels like I say to myself, “Man it’s easy to see Fleetwood winning here” at least three times every major season.

14. Justin Thomas (T53 in 2016): Might be the forgotten man. Also might be like the third-best player in the world. We live in a world that doesn’t think beyond the last week, much less the last three months, but Thomas was awesome to start 2019 and played quite well in Scotland last weekend. I confess the T53-MC-MC start to his Open career does not engender a load of confidence.

15. Hideki Matsuyama (T6 in 2013): Has not thrived at this tournament recently, but he’s having an unbelievable ball-striking season and should be helped by this little fact as noted by Golfweek.

The Forecaddie counted an almost perfect blend of shot shapes required off the tees and greens, setting up ideally for stout ball strikers who may just be so-so on the putting surfaces.

16. Louis Oosthuizen (Won in 2010): T7 at the U.S. Open was just his second top-10 at a major since nearly winning St. Andrews in 2015. I loved this recent tidbit about why Oosthuizen once played the John Deere Classic the week before the Open (although he didn’t this year) before taking the chartered flight from Illinois to Europe.

The jet has also drawn elite players with a curiosity for the tournament. “Louis Oosthuizen is a huge John Deere guy,” Peterson said. “He bought a 6000 series tractor with his Open winnings and came here the year after he won to go on a factory tour. The jet allowed him to still get on and go and defend.”

17. Webb Simpson (T12 in 2018): Since missing the cut at Liverpool in 2014, Simpson has steadily improved every year at this event. That culminated in a T12 last year at Carnoustie. Last time we saw him in Europe, he was downing Justin Rose in a Ryder Cup singles match.

18. Rickie Fowler (T2 in 2014): Interestingly, since he lost to McIlroy in 2014, Fowler hasn’t finished in the top 10 at a tournament where he should thrive. No top 10s anywhere this year since the Wells Fargo Championship in May.

19. Jason Day (T4 in 2015): Doesn’t top 10 at Opens but doesn’t really miss cuts either. I’m unsure of the antihistamine situation in Northern Ireland.

20. Jordan Spieth (Won in 2017): I realize this sounds ludicrous given how poor he’s been in 2019, but I can’t ignore the three top 10s here in the last five years, nor the whole “playing in the final pairing” thing last year at Carnoustie. These places have a way of unearthing whatever magic you have buried.

21. Marc Leishman (T2 in 2015): He’s one of just four golfers with three or more top 10s at the last five of these. The faster and firmer the track, the better off Leishman should be. He should thrive at a classic like Portrush

Royal Portrush 2019 Live

Royal Portrush 2019 Live: Royal Portrush and other venues that will be holding the famous Open The Open makes an historic return to Northern Ireland in 2019.Tickets to The 148th Open Tickets on Championship Days are sold out. However there are a limited number of hospitality experiences still available.Authorised Providers Want to book travel, accommodation and tee times with your ticket to The Open? Find out how to experience all the,Welcome to Royal Portrush Golf Clubin the world, the Dunluce Links, with where the 148th Open Championship will be staged on July 14th-21st 2019.

The County Antrim club will host the 148th staging of the game’s oldest major, 68 years after it held the only other Open to be played outside of England and Scotland.

Some 215,000 fans are expected at the Dunluce course during the week, with tickets selling out for both tournament and practice days.

When the serious action begins, Northern Ireland’s Darren Clarke will hit the opening tee shot at 06:35 BST on Thursday.Despite the early start, the grandstands around the first tee are certain to be packed in order to watch the 2011 Open champion and local favourite tee off.

Clarke was brought up further inland at Dungannon but has a house next to the course and said it was an “honour” to be asked by the R&A to begin proceedings.

It has been a long wait for Portrush to host its second Open, and much has changed in that time, including the creation of two new holes – the seventh and eighth.

Flamboyant Englishman Max Faulkner was awarded £300 and the Claret Jug the last time it was held at Portrush, which is just a few miles down the coast from the Giant’s Causeway.

While the famous trophy remains, this year’s winner will receive a cheque for £1.56m and the R&A predicts the tournament will deliver an £80m boost to the local economy.Rory McIlroy has won four majors already so has experienced the emotion of winning the game’s biggest prizes – but he admits lifting the Claret Jug on home soil on Sunday could see him “burst out crying”.

The Northern Irishman has pedigree at Portrush, setting the course record of 61 as a 16-year-old during the North of Ireland Championship.

Fourteen years later and sitting third in the world rankings, McIlroy will hope to embrace the huge home support he will have as he looks to end a five-year wait for a fifth major title.

“I want to enjoy it and give these crowds something to cheer for,” said the 2014 champion, who remembers meeting Clarke when he visited the club aged 10.

The third Northern Irish major champion in the field is Graeme McDowell, who was born and raised in the town but who says his family could not afford memberships at Royal Portrush when he was growing up, so instead they joined the Rathmore club that plays on Royal Portrush’s second course, the Valley.

He told the European Tour he remembers sneaking on to play the course as a teenager with brother Gary, who is now part of Royal Portrush’s greenkeeping staff.

But the more recognisable McDowell almost did not make it to his home Open, and admits he would have found it hard to be in the town in a different capacity had he not qualified.

The 2010 US Open champion did however eventually book his spot in June after a tie for eighth place at the Canadian Open.

World number four Justin Rose is the highest-ranked Englishman in the field as he seeks to add to his lone major victory – the 2013 US Open – while Tommy Fleetwood, who has seaside nous given he grew up playing the great links of Southport, says he is expecting Portrush to feel like a “home” venue.

Andrew ‘Beef’ Johnston made it into the field with one of the week’s feel-good stories, finishing tied fourth at the Scottish Open on Sunday to qualify after a difficult couple of years in which he had dropped to 337th in the rankings.Brooks Koepka is not only the world number one and a four-time major champion, but he also has the benefit of some insider knowledge.

The 29-year-old’s caddie is Portrush local Ricky Elliott, who Koepka says would become a “legend” in the town if he helps the American clinch a first Open title.

“I don’t think when he grew up that he ever thought there would be an Open Championship here,” said Koepka. “It would be cool to see him win.”

Koepka’s fellow big-hitting American Dustin Johnson is second in the rankings and has three top-10 Open finishes to his name but he missed the cut last year and Portrush’s Dunluce course is likely to resist being overpowered.

The last of Phil Mickelson’s five majors came at The Open in 2013 but he has missed six cuts in his past 10 tournaments this year and has taken drastic action in a bid to find some form.

The 49-year-old said on social media he has shed 15lbs after a six-day fast that saw him drink water and a “special coffee blend” before arriving in Northern Ireland.

Fans will naturally be keen to catch a glimpse of Tiger Woods, the 15-time major champion and three-time Open winner who will be playing competitively in Northern Ireland for the first time.

Woods capped his remarkable comeback from injury and personal strife by winning the Masters in April, his first major victory since 2008.

The 43-year-old was however unable to recreate that form in the following two majors, missing the cut at the US PGA Championship and finishing tied 21st at the US Open.

The Portrush set-up has impressed the world number five but he has only played three tournaments since that Masters victory in order to preserve his body, and the cool and probably wet weather may not help his stiff back.

Defending champion Francesco Molinari, the first Italian to win a major when he lifted the Claret Jug at Carnoustie last July, will be looking to recreate the 2018 form that also saw him become a hero in the Ryder Cup.

Molinari has talked up his mental resilience in the build-up, after missing out on a second major title at the Masters in April despite leading with seven holes to play.

If the Claret Jug is to end up in new hands come Sunday evening, American US Open champion Gary Woodland, Spain’s John Rahm and Australian Adam Scott are a trio that could easily contend.

Open Championship 2019 Live

Open Championship 2019 Live: The Open makes an historic return to Northern Ireland in 2019. Golf’s oldest and most international championship returns after 68 years with the world’s greatest,The 148th Open at Royal Portrush. Buy tickets and hospitality and the latest news and video from golf’s oldest Major Championship.The 2019 Open Championship will be the 148th Open Championship, scheduled for 18–21 July at Royal Portrush Golf Club in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

The County Antrim club will host the 148th staging of the game’s oldest major, 68 years after it held the only other Open to be played outside of England and Scotland.

Some 215,000 fans are expected at the Dunluce course during the week, with tickets selling out for both tournament and practice days.

When the serious action begins, Northern Ireland’s Darren Clarke will hit the opening tee shot at 06:35 BST on Thursday.Despite the early start, the grandstands around the first tee are certain to be packed in order to watch the 2011 Open champion and local favourite tee off.

Clarke was brought up further inland at Dungannon but has a house next to the course and said it was an “honour” to be asked by the R&A to begin proceedings.

It has been a long wait for Portrush to host its second Open, and much has changed in that time, including the creation of two new holes – the seventh and eighth.

Flamboyant Englishman Max Faulkner was awarded £300 and the Claret Jug the last time it was held at Portrush, which is just a few miles down the coast from the Giant’s Causeway.

While the famous trophy remains, this year’s winner will receive a cheque for £1.56m and the R&A predicts the tournament will deliver an £80m boost to the local economy.Rory McIlroy has won four majors already so has experienced the emotion of winning the game’s biggest prizes – but he admits lifting the Claret Jug on home soil on Sunday could see him “burst out crying”.

The Northern Irishman has pedigree at Portrush, setting the course record of 61 as a 16-year-old during the North of Ireland Championship.

Fourteen years later and sitting third in the world rankings, McIlroy will hope to embrace the huge home support he will have as he looks to end a five-year wait for a fifth major title.

“I want to enjoy it and give these crowds something to cheer for,” said the 2014 champion, who remembers meeting Clarke when he visited the club aged 10.

The third Northern Irish major champion in the field is Graeme McDowell, who was born and raised in the town but who says his family could not afford memberships at Royal Portrush when he was growing up, so instead they joined the Rathmore club that plays on Royal Portrush’s second course, the Valley.

He told the European Tour he remembers sneaking on to play the course as a teenager with brother Gary, who is now part of Royal Portrush’s greenkeeping staff.

But the more recognisable McDowell almost did not make it to his home Open, and admits he would have found it hard to be in the town in a different capacity had he not qualified.

The 2010 US Open champion did however eventually book his spot in June after a tie for eighth place at the Canadian Open.

World number four Justin Rose is the highest-ranked Englishman in the field as he seeks to add to his lone major victory – the 2013 US Open – while Tommy Fleetwood, who has seaside nous given he grew up playing the great links of Southport, says he is expecting Portrush to feel like a “home” venue.

Andrew ‘Beef’ Johnston made it into the field with one of the week’s feel-good stories, finishing tied fourth at the Scottish Open on Sunday to qualify after a difficult couple of years in which he had dropped to 337th in the rankings.Brooks Koepka is not only the world number one and a four-time major champion, but he also has the benefit of some insider knowledge.

The 29-year-old’s caddie is Portrush local Ricky Elliott, who Koepka says would become a “legend” in the town if he helps the American clinch a first Open title.

“I don’t think when he grew up that he ever thought there would be an Open Championship here,” said Koepka. “It would be cool to see him win.”

Koepka’s fellow big-hitting American Dustin Johnson is second in the rankings and has three top-10 Open finishes to his name but he missed the cut last year and Portrush’s Dunluce course is likely to resist being overpowered.

The last of Phil Mickelson’s five majors came at The Open in 2013 but he has missed six cuts in his past 10 tournaments this year and has taken drastic action in a bid to find some form.

The 49-year-old said on social media he has shed 15lbs after a six-day fast that saw him drink water and a “special coffee blend” before arriving in Northern Ireland.

Fans will naturally be keen to catch a glimpse of Tiger Woods, the 15-time major champion and three-time Open winner who will be playing competitively in Northern Ireland for the first time.

Woods capped his remarkable comeback from injury and personal strife by winning the Masters in April, his first major victory since 2008.

The 43-year-old was however unable to recreate that form in the following two majors, missing the cut at the US PGA Championship and finishing tied 21st at the US Open.

The Portrush set-up has impressed the world number five but he has only played three tournaments since that Masters victory in order to preserve his body, and the cool and probably wet weather may not help his stiff back.

Defending champion Francesco Molinari, the first Italian to win a major when he lifted the Claret Jug at Carnoustie last July, will be looking to recreate the 2018 form that also saw him become a hero in the Ryder Cup.

Molinari has talked up his mental resilience in the build-up, after missing out on a second major title at the Masters in April despite leading with seven holes to play.

If the Claret Jug is to end up in new hands come Sunday evening, American US Open champion Gary Woodland, Spain’s John Rahm and Australian Adam Scott are a trio that could easily contend.

Tunisia Nigeria

Tunisia Nigeria: The AFCON 2019 Date, Time, Live Stream for Tunisia vs. Nigeria Tunisia play Nigeria on Wednesday in the third-place play-off at the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations at the Al Salam Stadium in Cairo, Egypt.

The Eagles of Carthage saw their hopes of lifting the trophy ended in the semi-final by Senegal. A Dylan Bronn own goal in extra time sent the Lions of Teranga into the final.

Meanwhile, Nigeria were beaten by Algeria in their last-four clash. Manchester City’s Riyad Mahrez scored a 95th-minute winner to secure a 2-1 win over the Super Eagles.Date: Wednesday, July 17

Time: 9 p.m. local time/8 p.m. BST/3 p.m. ET

TV Info: Eurosport (UK), BeIN Sports (U.S.)The Eagles of Carthage have struggled to impress at the tournament despite making it to the last four.

They scraped into the knockout phase after drawing all three group games, needed penalties to overcome Ghana but then produced their best display to beat minnows Madagascar 3-0 in the quarter-finals.

The team had chances to beat Senegal in their semi-final but some poor finishing let them down, as noted by African football writer Gary Al-Smith:Tunisia goalkeeper Mouez Hassen was also at fault for Senegal’s winning goal and has endured a turbulent tournament.

The 24-year-old has been guilty of mistakes against Mali and Senegal that have cost his side goals (UK only):He also reacted angrily when substituted ahead of a penalty shootout against Ghana but apologised to his team-mates after the match, per Goal’s Babatunde Samuel.

Yet Tunisia are defensively disciplined and have only conceded four goals. However, they will need to show more going forward if they are to see off Nigeria.

The Super Eagles’ late defeat by Algeria has increased pressure on manager Gernot Rohr. He has come under scrutiny for his tactics and team selection throughout the tournament.

Nigeria vs Tunisia

Nigeria vs Tunisia: The AFCON 2019 Date, Time, Live Stream for Tunisia vs. Nigeria Tunisia play Nigeria on Wednesday in the third-place play-off at the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations at the Al Salam Stadium in Cairo, Egypt.

The Eagles of Carthage saw their hopes of lifting the trophy ended in the semi-final by Senegal. A Dylan Bronn own goal in extra time sent the Lions of Teranga into the final.

Meanwhile, Nigeria were beaten by Algeria in their last-four clash. Manchester City’s Riyad Mahrez scored a 95th-minute winner to secure a 2-1 win over the Super Eagles.Date: Wednesday, July 17

Time: 9 p.m. local time/8 p.m. BST/3 p.m. ET

TV Info: Eurosport (UK), BeIN Sports (U.S.)The Eagles of Carthage have struggled to impress at the tournament despite making it to the last four.

They scraped into the knockout phase after drawing all three group games, needed penalties to overcome Ghana but then produced their best display to beat minnows Madagascar 3-0 in the quarter-finals.

The team had chances to beat Senegal in their semi-final but some poor finishing let them down, as noted by African football writer Gary Al-Smith:Tunisia goalkeeper Mouez Hassen was also at fault for Senegal’s winning goal and has endured a turbulent tournament.

The 24-year-old has been guilty of mistakes against Mali and Senegal that have cost his side goals (UK only):He also reacted angrily when substituted ahead of a penalty shootout against Ghana but apologised to his team-mates after the match, per Goal’s Babatunde Samuel.

Yet Tunisia are defensively disciplined and have only conceded four goals. However, they will need to show more going forward if they are to see off Nigeria.

The Super Eagles’ late defeat by Algeria has increased pressure on manager Gernot Rohr. He has come under scrutiny for his tactics and team selection throughout the tournament.

Tunisia vs Nigeria

Tunisia vs Nigeria: AFCON 2019 Date, Time, Live Stream for Tunisia vs. Nigeria Tunisia play Nigeria on Wednesday in the third-place play-off at the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations at the Al Salam Stadium in Cairo, Egypt.

The Eagles of Carthage saw their hopes of lifting the trophy ended in the semi-final by Senegal. A Dylan Bronn own goal in extra time sent the Lions of Teranga into the final.

Meanwhile, Nigeria were beaten by Algeria in their last-four clash. Manchester City’s Riyad Mahrez scored a 95th-minute winner to secure a 2-1 win over the Super Eagles.Date: Wednesday, July 17

Time: 9 p.m. local time/8 p.m. BST/3 p.m. ET

TV Info: Eurosport (UK), BeIN Sports (U.S.)The Eagles of Carthage have struggled to impress at the tournament despite making it to the last four.

They scraped into the knockout phase after drawing all three group games, needed penalties to overcome Ghana but then produced their best display to beat minnows Madagascar 3-0 in the quarter-finals.

The team had chances to beat Senegal in their semi-final but some poor finishing let them down, as noted by African football writer Gary Al-Smith:Tunisia goalkeeper Mouez Hassen was also at fault for Senegal’s winning goal and has endured a turbulent tournament.

The 24-year-old has been guilty of mistakes against Mali and Senegal that have cost his side goals (UK only):He also reacted angrily when substituted ahead of a penalty shootout against Ghana but apologised to his team-mates after the match, per Goal’s Babatunde Samuel.

Yet Tunisia are defensively disciplined and have only conceded four goals. However, they will need to show more going forward if they are to see off Nigeria.

The Super Eagles’ late defeat by Algeria has increased pressure on manager Gernot Rohr. He has come under scrutiny for his tactics and team selection throughout the tournament.

Africa Cup of Nations 2019

Africa Cup of Nations 2019: The Football win would top Champions League title, says Senegal’s Mané The west African team known as the Teranga Lions are two victories away from fulfilling the dream of their 27-year-old talisman, starting with a semi-final against Tunisia in Egypt Sunday.

“Going to Dakar with the trophy would be extraordinary,” said Mané, who shared the Premier League Golden Boot award last season with fellow Africans Mohamed Salah and Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang.

“My absolute dream is to help Senegal win the Africa Cup of Nations – that would surpass even what I achieved with Liverpool in the Champions League.Mané has played slightly in the shadow of Mohamed Salah at Liverpool, and this tournament in Egypt was meant to be all about Salah.

But with Egypt gone and Senegal in the semifinals, Mané has his chance to be the centre of attention and carry his nation to glory.

Can Liverpool’s Mané take Senegal to Africa Cup of Nations glory?

Senegal have been waiting 54 years for an African title. They played in 14 tournaments since 1965, more than any other team, but without winning the trophy.

“We have to accept being among the favourites and many people are assuming we will play Algeria in the final,” said Mané, the scorer of three goals so far in the tournament.

“All four semi-finalists are quality sides and all can go on and win this competition. The champions will be the team that wants the trophy the most,” he added.

Tunisian slow starters

Senegal, Africa’s highest-ranking squad, will be taking on second-placed Tunisia for a place in Friday’s final.

It is the first time the Eagles of Carthage have qualified for the penultimate stage since hosting and winning the 2004 edition.

Senegal lost narrowly to hosts Egypt two years later, and that was the last time they featured in a Cup of Nations semi-final.

The Senegalese have impressed more than the Tunisians en route to the last four with Napoli centre-back Kalidou Koulibaly and Mané playing leading roles in a four win-one loss run.

Tunisia drew four consecutive matches before taking advantage of jaded giant-killers Madagascar to win 3-0 with captain Youssef Msakni among the goal-scorers.

Midfielder Ferjani Sassi, who also found the net against Madagascar, said Tunisia had “gained momentum” since their lackluster start to the tournament.

The team’s gaining support, too, with chartered planes making their way across the top of the African continent carrying fans from Tunis to Cairo.

Foxes vs Eagles

Three hours after Senegal and Tunisia kick off in the expected mid-afternoon Cairo heat, Algeria face Nigeria 15 kilometres (9.3 miles) away in the other semi-final.

An eight-match Cup of Nations rivalry dating from the 1980 final won convincingly by hosts Nigeria continues with Algeria the slightest of favourites to reach the final.

After four consecutive victories – three of them without breaking a sweat – the Algerian Desert Foxes needed a penalty shootout to eliminate the Ivory Coast in the quarter-finals.

Algeria lost outstanding young right-back Youcef Atal to a shoulder injury in that match and coach Djamel Belmadi fears he will miss the rest of the tournament.

Nigeria’s Super Eagles recovered well from a shock group defeat by Madagascar to topple defending champions Cameroon and South Africa, who had stunned pre-tournament favourites Egypt.

“What I admire about my team is that they never give up. This refusal to accept defeat can take us a very long way,” said coach Gernot Rohr.

Arsenal Bayern Munich

Arsenal Bayern Munich: International Champions Cup probable line-ups, match stats and LIVE blog Arsenal arrived in the US on Thursday, and the clash with Bayern will be their second on US soil following a game against the Colorado Rapids on Monday. Unai Emery has the vast majority of his squad with him, but club captain Laurent Koscielny did not travel with the team, while Alex Iwobi and Mohamed Elneny are absent due to Africa Cup of Nations duty.

Reiss Nelson and Emile Smith-Rowe are two of several names in the Gunners’ ensemble that will be familiar to Bundesliga fans, having spent last season on loan at Hoffenheim and RB Leipzig respectively. Former Borussia Dortmund hitman Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang is expected to lead the line against the side he registered six goals and four assists against in 17 competitive outings during his time at BVB.

Bayern will be travelling with 19 members of their first-team squad and eight U19 players, but without new signing Lucas Hernandez, who has stayed in Munich to continue his rehabilitation programme following knee surgery. Canada international Alphonso Davies has cut short his holiday after playing at the CONCACAF Gold Cup until late in June and will join the team in Los Angeles.

New arrivals Benjamin Pavard and Fiete Arp will join Robert Lewandowski, Manuel Neuer and Co. Stateside, while head coach Niko Kovac has not ruled out further signings. “We’re looking at what the transfer market offers up,” he told the club’s official website. “We have to be patient.

I’m sure what our bosses have in mind will ensure we’re competitive on all fronts and can achieve our goals.” With Bernd Leno still suffering a finger injury, Emiliano Martínez is likely to start in goal for Arsenal next Thursday.

The Gunners are also missing three defenders as Hector Bellerin, Konstantinos Mavropanos and Rob Holding remain injured in the lead up to their first International Champions Cup game. Arsenal’s new signing, Brazilian youngster Gabriel Martinelli could also make his club debut.

Bayern Munich also carry three injuries within their squad with David Alaba and Kingsley Coman still out, as well as new centre-back arrival Lucas Hernandez who is only just overcoming his February knee injury.

Although Hernandez is back in training, there is still doubt whether the Frenchman will make his debut against the Gunners.

Two other new signings that will be hoping to make their debut in this International Champions Cup fixture are World Cup star Benjamin Pavard and the German youngster Jann-Fiete Arp.

Bayern Munich vs Arsenal

Bayern Munich vs Arsenal: International Champions Cup probable line-ups, match stats and LIVE blog Arsenal arrived in the US on Thursday, and the clash with Bayern will be their second on US soil following a game against the Colorado Rapids on Monday. Unai Emery has the vast majority of his squad with him, but club captain Laurent Koscielny did not travel with the team, while Alex Iwobi and Mohamed Elneny are absent due to Africa Cup of Nations duty.

Reiss Nelson and Emile Smith-Rowe are two of several names in the Gunners’ ensemble that will be familiar to Bundesliga fans, having spent last season on loan at Hoffenheim and RB Leipzig respectively. Former Borussia Dortmund hitman Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang is expected to lead the line against the side he registered six goals and four assists against in 17 competitive outings during his time at BVB.

Bayern will be travelling with 19 members of their first-team squad and eight U19 players, but without new signing Lucas Hernandez, who has stayed in Munich to continue his rehabilitation programme following knee surgery. Canada international Alphonso Davies has cut short his holiday after playing at the CONCACAF Gold Cup until late in June and will join the team in Los Angeles.

New arrivals Benjamin Pavard and Fiete Arp will join Robert Lewandowski, Manuel Neuer and Co. Stateside, while head coach Niko Kovac has not ruled out further signings. “We’re looking at what the transfer market offers up,” he told the club’s official website. “We have to be patient.

I’m sure what our bosses have in mind will ensure we’re competitive on all fronts and can achieve our goals.” With Bernd Leno still suffering a finger injury, Emiliano Martínez is likely to start in goal for Arsenal next Thursday.

The Gunners are also missing three defenders as Hector Bellerin, Konstantinos Mavropanos and Rob Holding remain injured in the lead up to their first International Champions Cup game. Arsenal’s new signing, Brazilian youngster Gabriel Martinelli could also make his club debut.

Bayern Munich also carry three injuries within their squad with David Alaba and Kingsley Coman still out, as well as new centre-back arrival Lucas Hernandez who is only just overcoming his February knee injury.

Although Hernandez is back in training, there is still doubt whether the Frenchman will make his debut against the Gunners.

Two other new signings that will be hoping to make their debut in this International Champions Cup fixture are World Cup star Benjamin Pavard and the German youngster Jann-Fiete Arp.